Time-Tested Methods Medical Students Should Try for Memorization

As a medical student, your studies are an eclectic mix of broad topics that require plenty of critical thinking and research as well as narrower topics that require intensive memorization. If you struggle to memorize things, you certainly aren’t alone. Below, you can discover some of the best and most trusted methods out there for memorizing information that is otherwise difficult to retain.

Practice the Content Over and Over

Memorization is like any other form of learning in that it’s all about training your brain to hold onto information and recall information when you need it. With that being said, most students find that simply repeating the information in their studies over and over again is the best way for them to commit it to memory. One of the most effective methods for this involves utilizing a customizable question bank platform that allows you to create a study session with only the information you need to memorize. Over time, the more you go through the questions, the more information you’ll be able to retain and recall.

Start Small and Work Your Way Up

There’s a pretty good chance that you won’t be able to memorize the name of every single part of the human anatomy in a week, but you certainly can break that anatomy down into chunks and memorize it one small piece at a time. For example, imagine for a moment that you need to memorize the names and locations of 40 bones in a period of two weeks. On the first day, you can start out with a total of five bones and memorize those. The next day, add in four or five more, but continue to study the previous ones, too. Over time, you’ll find that adding in new information slowly is a great method, especially when you continue to review the old information day after day at the same time.

Write Things Down or Say Them Out Loud – or Both

Most students fall into one of two categories when it comes to memorizing things. The first category consists of students who do best when they can visually see the information on a page, and the second consists of students who can audibly hear the information being spoken. As such, depending on the method that works best for you, make sure that you’re taking extensive notes or audibly repeating the information you need to study over and over again. If you aren’t sure which method works best for you, try both – repeat the information out loud as you write it. Assigning an action or sound to each piece of information is a great way to commit it to memory.

Memorization can be tricky, and that’s especially true in medical school where so much of your career will rely on your ability to memorize everything from the names of medications to the location of even the tiniest bones in the human body. However, with some time and effort – and by following some of the tips above – you’ll find that memorization starts to come more naturally over time.

 

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